Sparling

Sparling on the Cree spawning ground

‘Saving the Sparling’ Project

Loch Ken Fisheries Study

Galloway Fisheries Trust have been commissioned under the Galloway Glens Landscape Partnership Project to undertake the 'Loch Ken Fisheries Study'.

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Salmon parr

Salmon parr found across Dumfries and Galloway

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Trout parr

Commonly found across Dumfries and Galloway

Gallery

Skunk cabbage

An invasive plant species that has the capacity to block waterways if left unchecked.

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Galloway Fisheries Trust Projects


The GFT delivers a wide range of projects across the region’s freshwaters and the surrounding catchment.

Please find below summaries of our projects that we are in the process of delivering or have completed recently.  When possible we will have included summary reports and data.  These project summaries will be regularly updated so you know what we are working on.

Loch Ken Fisheries Study

Loch Ken is a popular coarse angling venue. During the mid-1990’s North American signal crayfish were identified in the loch. These non-native crayfish are now abundant in Loch Ken and were believed to be having an adverse impact on the fish although this had not been quantified. The main objective of this study was to assess the condition of the fish stocks within Loch Ken. Using the data collected, recommendations for the future management of Loch Ken as a coarse fishery have been made.

Saving the Sparling

Sparling were found in various Scottish rivers in the past but died out from many due to over fishing, pollution or the building of barriers stopping them getting to their spawning beds. In Scotland they are now one of our rarest fish, apparently only remaining in the Cree, Forth and Tay. The Saving the Sparling project runs for 2 years and employs interns to study the local sparling population in the Cree and to work with and inform the local community about these wonderful fish.

Partnership Delivery of Prioritised Salmon Habitat Restoration in the Galloway River Catchments

GFT data shows that degraded habitats are limiting the numbers and health of juvenile salmon and smolts. This needs to be addressed if local salmon stocks are going to survive in the long term. Organisations need to work together in partnership to identify opportunities for habitat enhancement at a catchment scale particularly within wider work programmes. There are good opportunities and willingness for significant partnership working to be undertaken. This is the main focus of the project.

Improving the Accuracy of Atlantic salmon Conservation Limits in SW Scotland

In 2016, the Scottish Government implemented conservation limits with the aim of conserving and protecting Atlantic salmon. Conservation limits are used to assess whether each river in Scotland has enough wild Atlantic salmon eggs available to fill all available habitat accessible to salmon. Conservation limits take into account several factors but currently does not take into account differences in angling effort and exploitation rates between rivers.

Invasive Non-Native Plant Species Control Projects

Over the years, various plants from around the world have been brought to Scotland, either for populating botanical gardens or accidentally when importing goods.

Black Water of Dee Restoration Project

The lower Black Water of Dee, downstream of the Clatteringshaws Dam, was studied in 2016 by GFT to investigate how the fish populations have reacted to an increase in compensation water flow which had started in 2012. The study also examined the habitats present along the watercourse and considered whether further improvements to instream habitats, riparian habitats or water flows were required to assist in the recovery of the fish stocks. The recommendations to be delivered by GFT early 2019.

Bladnoch Restoration Feasibility Study

Acidification of the upper River Bladnoch catchment, which has been exacerbated by afforestation and peatland degradation is the main limiting factor for juvenile Atlantic salmon recruitment. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of juvenile Atlantic salmon in relation to water quality and other limiting factors such as habitat availability, and provide recommendations for restoration projects with the aim of improving water quality and/or juvenile Atlantic salmon abundance.

Time To Return Charr To Loch Grannoch?

Arctic charr historically lived in two upland Galloway lochs; Loch Grannoch and Dungeon. Both lochs lie in the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee catchment. The charr populations died out many years ago due to acidification. Although the trout populations in these waters were severely depleted by the low pH they did survive. In recent years water quality has improved and the trout populations have recovered significantly.

Peatland Restoration Work

Headwaters of many Galloway rivers suffer from acidification following the heavy drainage and planting of the uplands with blanket Sitka spruce. A functional peatland plays an important role by storing carbon, slowing down water run-off and helping to remove pollutants. If a peatland is heavily drained then it becomes degraded and less efficient. Restoring degraded peatland is an important technique to improve water quality, especially acidification, in upland waters.

Old Mill Burn Restoration Project

A large weir which was inhibiting salmonid fish passage within the Old Mill Burn, near Twynholm, was successfully removed in 2016 as part of a national fish barrier easement project. Since the weir was removed, GFT have been monitoring the successful recolonisation of migratory fish into the burn.

Counting salmon on the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee

Fish counters provide an excellent tool for stock assessment and in Scotland, there are 39 in operation. 13 of these are Vaki Riverwatcher fish counters, one of which is in Galloway, located at the bottom of the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee in Tongland fish pass. It was installed in 2007 and is owned by Drax and maintained by the GFT. All migratory fish returning to the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee must pass through this counter and annually, between 500 and 1000 salmon have been recorded in recent years

Latest News


The New Sparling Model Has Arrived!

GFT commissioned a Bolton based taxidermist, Phillip Leggett to create a realistic sparling model. This model accurately represents three adult sparling, which grow up to 30cm and are still present in the River Cree.

Fisheries Management Scotland- Annual Report

GFT recently attended the Fisheries Management Scotland Conference 'Salmon and People in a changing world.

Sparling Goes To School

This year's Saving the Sparling Project Intern has been continuing with the Sparling Goes to School Project by visiting local primary schools to teach pupils about the amazing Sparling.

Water of Fleet electrofishing results 2016-2018

GFT undertake electrofishing surveys on Galloway's river catchments each year. This is a summary of a report on the health of salmon and trout populations in the Fleet catchment between 2016 and 2018.

Saving the Sparling update by Courtney Rowland

Courtney is GFT's second Saving the Sparling intern. She has been working towards the arrival of Sparling since she began in December, focusing on education and public engagement. Sparling arrived in the Cree around the 22nd of February. This news story is Courtney's update on how it all went.

Can you help please!

GFT are presently investigating the distribution of North American Signal Crayfish across Galloway and are interested in hearing reports of any recent sightings.

Talking tunnels and turbines in the hazy February sunshine

Two schools were able to make the most of the unseasonably warm weather upon Tongland Dam during their visits to the Galloway Hydro Scheme this week

The Conservation of Salmon (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 2019

Last week the Scottish Ministers laid regulations in the Scottish Parliament setting out the provisions to regulate killing salmon in Scottish waters for the 2019 fishing season.

11th February Meeting

Each spring the GFT organises an afternoon of presentations covering our work over the previous year. The attendees are usually various funders, supporting organisations, key stakeholders and interested parties.

Investigating the prevalence of fungal infected Atlantic salmon at Tongland fish pass.

During the summer this year, we undertook a project (commissioned by Scottish Power) examining why in some years at Tongland fish pass there are a larger number of returning adult Atlantic salmon which are heavily infected with Saprolegnia fungus, in comparison to other years.

Urr timed electrofishing results

A summary of the 2018 timed electrofishing surveys for the Urr are provided. These surveys target salmon fry and provide information on annual fluctuations and distribution across 12 sites spread over the catchment.

The new Saving the Sparling intern starts

We would like to introduce the new Saving the Sparling intern who started on Monday the 17th December. Courtney Rowland will be working for the next 5 months on delivering phase 2 of the Saving the Sparling Project.