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Galloway Fisheries Trust

Fisheries House, Station Industrial Estate, Newton Stewart, Dumfries & Galloway, Scotland. DG8 6ND
Telephone: 01671 403011 · Fax: 01671 402248 · Scottish Registered Charity No. SC020751

Looking downstream on the River Cree

Brown Trout

Looking upstream on the River Bladnoch

Felling of commercial forestry in Galloway Forest Park

Looking upstream on the River Luce

North American Signal Crayfish

The sandy beach at Loch Grannoch

Belted Galloway Cattle, or 'Belties'

Fly fishing on the River Cree

Murray's Monument

A small upland burn

A stoneloach

The High Cree, looking towards Cairnsmore of Fleet

A small waterfall on the Buchan Burn

A salmon from the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee

Torhouse walk and evening talk

06 December 2013

Wigtown Talks and Walks group during their tour of our hatchery on Tuesday

Wigtown Talks and Walks group during their tour of our hatchery on Tuesday

Jackie explains how to identify the two species of shad

Jackie explains how to identify the two species of shad

On Tuesday, Wigtown Talks and Walks group spent an ‘away day’ afternoon at Torhouse Trout Farm where they enjoyed a tour of our Bladnoch hatchery. At the hatchery, we are able to explain the restoration reasons behind stocking the upper Bladnoch with salmon fry. Jamie and Jackie were also on site dissecting shad samples for analysis to further our understanding of Twaite and Allis Shad distribution within the Solway.

After leaving the hatchery, the group then joined Torhouse Trout Farm manager Mark Davies for a tour of the fish farm. Mark has been involved in the aquaculture industry for over thirty years and manages two fish farms locally. Beginning with rainbow trout eggs of Danish origin, the fish are ready for market within around 14 months and are despatched on site at Torhouse and on the shelves of Asda the following day!

On Wednesday evening, Rowan gave a talk to the local Scottish Wildlife Trust Group who meet at the Gordon Memorial Hall in Castle Douglas regularly throughout the winter months. After hearing the background to why the GFT was set up in 1988, Rowan explained the very diverse range of fishery management tools adopted today locally and nationally that help conserve freshwater fish species amidst threats including acidification, hydro development and non-native species. Following on, Rowan gave a more detailed account of current GFT work taking place on the Kirkcudbrightshire Dee system.


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